Cunila origanoides L. Britton (stonemint, frost mint, dittany)

16 Jun
Jim Stasz @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

Jim Stasz @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

The common dittany, (Cunila origanoides L.), is a herbaceous perennial and a member of the mint family.  The name means “like oregano” and from July to September/October, the plant shows purplish flowers. In late autumn or early winter, it can create “frost flowers” when the water pushes out of the roots and freezes in the form of tiny ice sculptures. In warmer weather, the  flowers attract butterflies, skippers, bees and other insects.

Source list: USDA, NRCS. 2014. The PLANTS Database (http://plants.usda.gov, 16 June 2014). National Plant Data Team, Greensboro, NC 27401-4901 USA; http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=j950; Plants for a Future database (http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Cunila+origanoides); The Green Farmacy Garden (http://thegreenfarmacygarden.com/page/2/) MDC Online (http://mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/dittany )

 

 

 

 

 

3 Responses to “Cunila origanoides L. Britton (stonemint, frost mint, dittany)”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. What’s In Our Butterfly Garden | Concord Village EarthLab - June 16, 2014

    […] Dittany (Stone mint) […]

  2. Green Monster! Orange Eggs! | Concord Village EarthLab - July 19, 2014

    […] question: Are these lady bug eggs?  They’re on the dittany or stone mint plant, which is just starting to […]

  3. What’s In Our Butterfly Garden: August ’14 Edition | Concord Village EarthLab - August 6, 2014

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