Tag Archives: butterflies

Today’s Monarch Migration Happenings: 9-11-2021

11 Sep

After naming, tagging, and releasing 13 newborn Monarch butterflies on Friday, we had more insect fun on Saturday. Two females, Lola (above) and Flyer (below), were netted, tagged, and released.



We watch, we wait, and eventually catch the butterflies with nets — swooping down when they’re feeding from one of the white butterfly bushes in the play area.


We capture caterpillars that we spot on milkweed plants. This is the only plant that hosts them, the only place a female will lay eggs, so when we see a caterpillar on milkweed, we know it’s a Monarch.


Marley, shown above, was discovered, named, and placed inside a habitat. She’ll eat milkweed leaves for the next week, until she’s big enough to go into a chrysalis in which she’ll transform into a butterfly over 7-10 days. You can see the lifecycle here:

We found and housed 4-5 swallowtail caterpillars in a habitat, but we don’t study or tag these, typically. We’re working with Monarchs as part of a citizen science project from MonarchWatch, a group that helps conserve the important pollinators. Learn more here.

The Monarch Migration is forecast to continue to move through Brooklyn until about Sept 26th — we’re smack in the middle peak season! Stay tuned for more local reports. –Denise

Read posts from previous migrations:

Monarch Butterfly was Tagged, Released Today (2019; CV Has Monarch Caterpillars (2019;

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2:30-3pm Friday, 9/10: Big Butterfly Release!

9 Sep

We plan to tag and release 13 Monarch butterflies from the garden tomorrow. All are welcome to watch — and we’d love help taking photos and video!  See pics from a previous release here.

Eastern Swallowtail Surprise

20 Jul

This beauty left eggs behind when she visited Sunday. Look for them, and baby caterpillars, on the parsley, dill, and fennel.

Update:  Almost certainly a black Eastern swallowtail.  According to this source, egg stage lasts 4 to 9 days… Should we rescue and raise one of these guys?

Fennel plants by play area entry gate

Monarch Caterpillar #2 Is Still Eating, Preparing for Transformation

26 Aug

This one is staying in the triangle-shaped habitat that is hanging from shrub next to garden shed behind 195 Adams.

Seen these Signs of Nature Babies?

29 Jun

   Butterfly larva.  (Looks like a painted lady butterfly. See more info about development stages here)

 

 

Teeny tiny egg shelll! Seen any new birds nests?

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s the egg next to a sharpie, for scale… I will leave this egg on the raised herb beds outside the play area in case anyone wants to take a peek!  –

 

 

 

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Skipper? Buckeye?

19 Jul

mothORbutterflyRegina spotted this specimen on the tomato plants today. Thoughts?

Update: Its a Red Admiral! Thanks to Sarah for the assist!

Cunila origanoides L. Britton (stonemint, frost mint, dittany)

16 Jun

Jim Stasz @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

Jim Stasz @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

The common dittany, (Cunila origanoides L.), is a herbaceous perennial and a member of the mint family.  The name means “like oregano” and from July to September/October, the plant shows purplish flowers. In late autumn or early winter, it can create “frost flowers” when the water pushes out of the roots and freezes in the form of tiny ice sculptures. In warmer weather, the  flowers attract butterflies, skippers, bees and other insects.

Source list: USDA, NRCS. 2014. The PLANTS Database (http://plants.usda.gov, 16 June 2014). National Plant Data Team, Greensboro, NC 27401-4901 USA; http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?kempercode=j950; Plants for a Future database (http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Cunila+origanoides); The Green Farmacy Garden (http://thegreenfarmacygarden.com/page/2/) MDC Online (http://mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/dittany )

 

 

 

 

 

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