Tag Archives: milkweed

Today’s Monarch Migration Happenings: 9-11-2021

11 Sep

After naming, tagging, and releasing 13 newborn Monarch butterflies on Friday, we had more insect fun on Saturday. Two females, Lola (above) and Flyer (below), were netted, tagged, and released.



We watch, we wait, and eventually catch the butterflies with nets — swooping down when they’re feeding from one of the white butterfly bushes in the play area.


We capture caterpillars that we spot on milkweed plants. This is the only plant that hosts them, the only place a female will lay eggs, so when we see a caterpillar on milkweed, we know it’s a Monarch.


Marley, shown above, was discovered, named, and placed inside a habitat. She’ll eat milkweed leaves for the next week, until she’s big enough to go into a chrysalis in which she’ll transform into a butterfly over 7-10 days. You can see the lifecycle here:

We found and housed 4-5 swallowtail caterpillars in a habitat, but we don’t study or tag these, typically. We’re working with Monarchs as part of a citizen science project from MonarchWatch, a group that helps conserve the important pollinators. Learn more here.

The Monarch Migration is forecast to continue to move through Brooklyn until about Sept 26th — we’re smack in the middle peak season! Stay tuned for more local reports. –Denise

Read posts from previous migrations:

Monarch Butterfly was Tagged, Released Today (2019; CV Has Monarch Caterpillars (2019;

Pre-migration Monarchs Persist

23 Jul

This looks like a female, here’s hoping she left behind some eggs! Keep an eye on the milkweed outside play area near honeysuckle, lavender, and comprey plants.

Monarch Caterpillar #2 Is Still Eating, Preparing for Transformation

26 Aug

This one is staying in the triangle-shaped habitat that is hanging from shrub next to garden shed behind 195 Adams.

Captured! Monarch Caterpillar

19 Aug

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Found this gal on milkweed today; she’s in the butterfly house hanging by the garden shed behind 195 Adams. Have a look! But please don’t remove or touch her — as bacteria from humans may harm her.

-Denise

Related:  What’s the Big Deal About Monarchs?

See Captive Monarch Caterpillar In Chrysalis 

Monarch Butterfly Was Tagged, Released Today

 

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Is This A Pupa? A Butterfly That Overwintered On Milkweed?

18 Mar

Found on native milkweed while pruning today:  A specimen that looks like it could be a pupa or some type of chrysalis.

We’ll investigate.

In the meantime, does anyone have a butterfly net or pop up display cage where we can place it outside?

Related stories: Plants In Our Butterfly-Friendly Garden ; June 2013 Caterpillar Spottings; Even Our Small Garden Can Help Native Bees! ; Monarch Butterfly Plants In Our Midst

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